about 

 
If mindfulness can be defined as the simple act of noticing things, then "A Painting a Day" is a kind of meditation. For me, these paintings are about the pleasure of seeing; of being cognizant of the world around me and pushing to find an alchemy between the paint, my subject and the moment. I view each piece as being part of a single, ongoing work.
    Duane Keiser, 2016

Duane Keiser studied painting under Raymond Berry at Randolph-Macon College in Ashland, Virginia and Lennart Anderson at Brooklyn College in NYC. His "A Painting a Day" blog, started in 2004, has been written about in numerous publications, including USA TodayThe New York Times and, most recently, The Huffington Post. Using a makeshift easel made from a cigar box, he made a postcard-sized painting each day and posted them to his blog where collectors could bid on them via eBay. He has exhibited at Fischbach Gallery, Allan Stone Gallery and, most recently, the New York Academy of Art. His work resides in several corporate collections and hundreds of private collections worldwide, including the Gregory Peterson Collection.

 

 

There are lots of things to see, unwrapped gifts and free surprises. The world is fairly studded and strewn with pennies cast broadside from a generous hand. But- and this is the point- who gets excited by a mere penny? If you follow one arrow, if you crouch motionless on a bank to watch a tremulous ripple thrill on the water and are rewarded by the sight of a muskrat kit paddling from its den, will you count that sight a chip of copper only, and go your rueful way? It is dire poverty indeed when a man is so malnourished and fatigued that he won't stoop to pick up a penny. But if you cultivate a healthy poverty and simplicity, so that finding a penny will literally make your day, then, since the world is in fact planted in pennies, you have with your poverty bought a lifetime of days. It is that simple. What you see is what you get.

 

Annie Dillard
from "Pilgrim at Tinker Creek."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

© 2018 by Duane Keiser